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Plan Develop Deploy Measure Sabin.io is a Data Engineering practice. Our focus is on helping companies deliver data systems. We help companies build sustainable applications that consider the support and ongoing development. The use of agile methodologies is fantastic but needs to be aligned with the engineering practices of testing, continuous integration/delivery and a feedback loop to enable continual improvement. Our experience stretches from windows server management and automation through to the support and management of BI systems. We have strong application development experience which means we are able to deliver and support solutions that work with all those involved

When to use CmdletBinding in PowerShell?

Clean Code At Sabin.IO we are big proponents of clean code. We use PowerShell a lot for automation, and want our code to be clean. You are automating everything, right? If not, please see a slide from a recent meetup: For me, clean code in PowerShell means (and not limited to): Small self-contained functions that have a single responsibility Number of arguments to a function kept as small as possible Consistent formatting No duplication of code Modules that hide internal functions, and only expose what’s needed Common Parameters One way to make code a bit cleaner is to make use

Create an Azure Active Directory Application and Key using PowerShell

I’ve been a SQL developer for a good few years now, and have also developed numerous web applications, web services and various console apps. However, lately I find myself getting into the world of DevOps, Azure, and necessarily, PowerShell. Whilst familiar with PowerShell to a degree, I’ve learnt a lot over the past few weeks about the Azure PowerShell module, and how we can use it to script tasks that you might not want to do manually in the Azure portal if you’re thinking about automation. This post should help if you want to create an Azure Active Directory application

How to install SQL Server on Windows Server Core?

As part of automation of database and application deployments, it makes sense to be able to create new SQL Server instances quickly and with minimal resources. I have already explored containers and written about it on this blog, but I’d like to turn your attention to setting up SQL Server on Windows Server Core for those of you that run SQL Server on-premise or within VMs in the cloud. In a domain environment it should be pretty simple to just create a PowerShell session to your target Windows Server where your account is a local administrator and then simply run

Using a Cloud Witness for Clusters

On a client site recently a question was asked about the file share witness in a SQL Server failover cluster on-premise, and where to put it if you only have 2 sites. As always, it depends! Let’s look at some scenarios. Bear in mind that use of the Azure Cloud Witness requires Windows Server 2016 or later. Topology 1 Three node cluster with 2 nodes at primary and 1 at disaster recovery (DR). Most people want high availability at their “primary site” and are happy to have standalone capability at the business continuity (DR) site. To save storage costs, I

Automating SQL Server Performance Testing

You run performance tests as well as functional tests when deploying new code changes to SQL Server, right? Not many people do, I think you should, and this article will show you how to do it by harnessing an existing performance tool, rather than writing your own monitoring infrastructure from scratch. Any good performance monitoring tool that records information to a database will do fine, and we prefer to use Sentry One . Here are the steps to accomplish this. Create a baseline database When you release your database change, you want to have something to compare against as an

Assist Deploy Is Available on GitHub

Hello! For some time now I have been working on automating SSIS deployments, and earlier this week I published my efforts on GitHub . But before I get into the what/how, let’s focus on the why and let me catch you up on how I got here… The task to take an ispac and deploy in and of itself is quite a straightforward process as there are multiple ways to do this . For those of you who want the abridged version of the linked post, the choices are as follows: Integration Services Deploy Wizard SSIS Catalog T-SQL API PowerShell