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Establishing a git workflow with VSTS and Visual Studio - git rebase

In this post I will look at git rebase in Visual Studio, in particular rebasing a working branch onto master and at what happens to each commit. This post will not make a case for rebase over alternatives, though the findings will contribute to the workflow that will be decided upon. All posts in this series on establishing a git workflow for VSTS and Visual Studio are: Establishing a git workflow with VSTS and Visual Studio Configuring a VSTS repo from the Github sample repo Git merge Git rebase (this post) Recap on setup If you have just landed on

Establishing a git workflow with VSTS and Visual Studio

Here at sabin.io we use VSTS backed by git repos. We have a wide range of ability in git and though some of us have being using git for several years, we are not git wizards. The this is git cartoon by the folks over at xkcd.com pretty much sums up my early experiences, which in turn enforced narrowing my use of git to a limited workflow and a preference of git bash over GUI. And so, even though I’ve been using git for several years, I have only scratched the surface. When tasked with defining our workflow, I found I

Establishing a git workflow with VSTS and Visual Studio - git merge

In this post I will look at git merge in Visual Studio, in particular merging down from master into a branch and at what happens to each commit. This post will not make a case for merge over alternatives such as rebase, though the findings will contribute to the workflow that will be decided upon. All posts in this series on establishing a git workflow for VSTS and Visual Studio are: Establishing a git workflow with VSTS and Visual Studio Configuring a VSTS repo from the Github sample repo Git merge (this post) Git rebase Recap on setup If you

Establishing a git workflow with VSTS and Visual Studio - pull requests

In this post I will look at pull request processing in VSTS. Over and above the pull request process, what is also interesting is any differences in the commit graph on the remote repo when merging up from a merged as compared to a rebased branch. As with previous posts in this series, this post will not make a case for either, though findings will contribute to the workflow that will be decided upon. All posts in this series on establishing a git workflow for VSTS and Visual Studio are: Establishing a git workflow with VSTS and Visual Studio Configuring

Establishing a git workflow with VSTS and Visual Studio - configuring a VSTS repo from the Github sample repo

Mid-way through writing what I expected to be the second post on establishing a git workflow with VSTS and Visual Studio, I realised the second post needed to be about configuring a VSTS repo from the Github sample repo git_workflow_sample_setup , since this action will be repeated for each of the subsequent posts that will look into merge, rebase and commit squashing. The sample code and branch structure are described in the first post Establishing a git workflow with VSTS and Visual Studio . First of all Throughout this post I assume the reader has some familiarity with VSTS. When

VSTS Git Repos no longer show as connected in Visual Studio

I hit something this week where one of my Git repos showed as disconnected in Visual Studio and Team Explorer was showing me the option to clone the repo. Which clearly I didn’t want to do as it was already cloned. You can see in the picture that I have the repo locally (at the bottom) but in the list of projects I get the clone button.   The root cause of this was that VSTS has been cleaning up an old artefact of its TFS history. For on premise TFS you have the ability to have collections, and one

Git: How to work on a feature branch but pull in later commits from another branch?

On a client site last week the question was raised: I want to work on a feature for a project which will take longer than other people merging their branches into the dev branch. I therefore want to merge any changes on the dev branch into mine, test my changes before pushing back to the dev branch, and then and ultimately master for a release. We are using a git flow methodology whereby the development manager will merge feature branches from developers’ branches via pull requests into the dev branch. Tests are run and if they pass, we merge into

Uploading Files To Data Lake Storage With PowerShell Part Three

Picking up from where we left off last month, we’re today we’re looking at setting the Azure Data Lake Storage account. This post is part of a series on automating the process of uploading files to Azure Data Lake Store , Although the entire script is available on Git (posted below) I’m going to go into one function per post so that I can go in greater depth. Part One of this blog series focused on logging in to an Azure Subscription. Part Two focused on setting the Resource Group. As mentioned, today’s function starts on row 74 and is

CosmosDb, know your costs, and remember…

This will be a short post to emphasize a simple point, yet one that should make an enormous difference to how you approach configuring a CosmosDb collection and modelling documents to support read and write requirements. Know your costs I cannot emphasize this point enough. The folks at Microsoft have made this really easy, be it via the Request Units (RU) and Data Storage calculator , the collection Query Explorer through the Azure Portal or a REST client such as Postman coupled with the really useful library and samples by a Microsoftie over on git documentdb postman collection . Let’s

Uploading Files To Data Lake Storage With PowerShell Part Two

Carrying on from our previous post on automating the process of uploading files to  Azure Data Lake Store , we will check if a Resource Group exists, and if it does not then it will create it. Although the entire script is available on Git (posted below) I’m going to go into one function per post so that I can go in greater depth. Part One of this blog series focused on logging in to an Azure Subscription. Today’s function starts on line 42 and is called Set-AzureResourceGroup. Before we go into it though, I want to take a moment

Continuous Integration with Jenkins, SQL Server and Windows Containers

Why use Windows Containers? When creating database applications we need consistency in all our environments to ensure quality releases. Traditionally developers might have their own instance of SQL Server on their workstation to develop against. Database projects would be created in SSDT and pushed to source control when ready for testing. If you’re not using SSDT for database development already, then you should seriously consider it to make your life easier and increase the quality of your releases. Ed Elliot explains why in this blog post . A problem with CI for databases is that databases are a shared resource